Some suggested corrections for the 8th assignment.

 

Please note that not all students had the same material on page 3 of the document ‘Practice Quizzes on Conditionals’. I have therefore included here a key for the exercise that I didn’t really want you to do.

 

Combine the following clauses to create sentences containing relative clauses.  The SECOND clause should be the one that becomes a relative clause.

 

1       Luigi told my wife that he's going to make a movie.

         He usually doesn't tell anyone his plans.

Luigi, who usually doesn't tell anyone his plans, told my wife that he's going to make a movie.

 

2       I'm referring to Luigi.

         He used to smoke in class.

I'm referring to Luigi, who used to smoke in class.

Or, with different meaning:

I'm referring to the Luigi who used to smoke in class.

 

3       She couldn't see him in the dark.

         That is why she was surprised by the noise.

She couldn't see him in the dark, which is why she was surprised by the noise.

 

4       She left the book lying open.

         I strongly disapproved of that.

She left the book lying open, which I strongly disapproved of.

 

5       She left the book lying open.

         I strongly disapproved of it.

She left the book (that) I strongly disapproved of lying open.

Or, with different meaning:

She left the book, which I strongly disapproved of, lying open.

She left the book, of which I strongly disapproved, lying open.

 

6       My sister Sheilagh bought a one-way ticket to Tampa.

         She hates the cold.

My sister Sheilagh, who hates the cold, bought a one-way ticket to Tampa.

 

7         Everything must be repaired by tomorrow.

         The things were broken during the trip.

Everything that was broken during the trip must be repaired by tomorrow.

 

8       You must go nowhere.

         You might be recognized.

You must go nowhere you might be recognized.

Recall that this exercise is about building relative clauses. Notice the sharp meaning contrast with other kinds of subordination, e.g.,

 

You must go nowhere / you mustn’t go anywhere, since you might be recognized.

 

9       Yours is the best assignment.

         I have seen assignments this year.

 

Yours is the best assignment (that) I have seen this year.

 

8       Now I know the reason.

         You left class early.

Now I know why you left class early.

 

9       When I was a student of translation, I never cared about

         (SOMETHING).

         The teacher said (SOMETHING) concerning punctuation.

When I was a student of translation, I never cared about what

the teacher said concerning punctuation.

 

10     Last year, three hundred Canadians died from the effects of cigarette smoke.

         They themselves were not smokers.

Last year, three hundred Canadians who themselves were not smokers died from the effects of cigarette smoke.

 

Notice the slight meaning difference:

 

Last year, three hundred Canadians, who themselves were not smokers, died from the effects of cigarette smoke.

 

 

See the picture of the masseur with his patient. Re-write the sentences below as suggested. Be sure to stick to the original meanings.

 

The patient has very delicate skin, which is why this unfortunate accident occurred. = If the patient didn’t have such delicate skin, this accident would not have occurred.

 

The masseur pushed a bit too hard because he lacks experience with elderly patients. = If the masseur didn’t lack experience with elderly patients, he wouldn’t have pushed so hard.

 

The masseur should use more oil from now on to prevent such mishaps. = If the masseur uses more oil from now on, that should prevent such mishaps.

 

It is usually enough to prevent such accidents for the masseur to use more oil. = When the masseur uses more oil, that usually is enough to prevent such accidents.

 

This may have happened because the patient did not ask the masseur to be careful. = This might not have happened if the patient had asked the masseur to be more careful.

 

Some of the patient’s ‘plug-and-play’ connections were broken and now he can’t get up! = If some of the patient’s ‘plug-and-play’ connections hadn’t been broken / If none of the patient’s ‘plug-and-play’ connections had been broken / If the patient hadn’t had any of his ‘plug-and-play’ connections broken, he would be able to get up now.

 

 

(This is the one you didn’t really need to do.)

MATCH ONE FROM THIS SIDE…

…WITH ONE ON THIS SIDE.

A)  If the patient has asked the masseur to be more careful, 2

1) this should not happen.

B) If the patient asks the masseur to be more careful, 1

2) this will not happen.

C) If the patient asked the masseur to be more careful, 4, 5

3) the patient must not have asked the masseur to be careful.

D) If the patient had asked the masseur to be more careful, 5, 6

4) this would not happen.

E) If this accident happened, 3

5) this would not be happening.

F) If this accident has happened, 3

6) this would not have happened.

(Kind of silly, isn’t it! [falling tone])

 

Match up each time expression on the left with one sentence on the right.

 

1.  Since two-o'clock, when Olga's puppy ate that suspicious cookie...e, f

a)  Olga wants to leave her at the vet's with her other pets!

2.  Since Olga's puppy has a tummy-ache...a (Note: this is the only right answer!)

b)  she was whimpering pitifully by the door!

3.  For two hours this morning...c; d is possible, but a bit odd and incomplete-sounding

c)  she whimpered pitifully by the door!

4.  For two hours that morning...d (Note: this is the only right answer; furthermore, the sentence is still incomplete.)

d)  she had been whimpering by the door for hours!

5.  By the time Olga's puppy digested that suspicious looking cookie…d

e)  she has been sitting by the door whimpering!

6.  Until Olga's puppy digests that suspicious cookie...a

f)  she has fouled the kitchen floor three times!