Beaulieu

 

Until my crazy sister gets here  I will be cooking (you may or may not have started cooking yet) / I will keep cooking (you probably have started cooking I’m cooking the strange tofu dessert. Your answer is possible in a very specific conversational situation. ‘Maybe you aren’t worried about what my sister will say, but she scares the bejabbers out of me. She’s going to want her **!* dessert when she gets back. You go watch TV and fool around if you feel like, but until she gets back, I’M WORKING ON THAT WEIRD TOFU SOUFFLÉ!’ Even so, in this context I would use ‘will be working’, ‘going to be working’.

 

Since I moved here I have new friends. Better: ‘I have made some new friends.’

 

Ever since I saw that weird movie I’m always watching my back. Avoid present progressive with ‘Since / Ever since’, even though you will hear this a lot in conversation and among uneducated TV and radio personalities. Present perfect and present perfect progressive are the possibilities in standard English. Also, the modal expression ‘keep’ is common in conversation:

 

Ever since I saw that weird movie, I keep watching my rear (conversational)

Ever since I saw that weird movie, I have kept  watching my rear (standard)

Ever since I saw that weird movie, I have been  watching my rear (standard)

 

By the time the course was over I was having lots of getting lot of problems with time words.

 

Bois

 

Until my crazy sister gets here I will clean the house. This suggests that you will be cleaning constantly right up to the time of her arrival.

Since I moved here my parents have visited me every week. Fine.

Ever since he saw that weird movie he has been acting very strangely. Indeed.

By the time the course was over they had learned a lot of things. Hell’s bells, I should hope so.

 

 

Brousseau

 

UNTIL MY CRAZY SISTER GETS HERE,

I will continue to throw tomatoes aton her car.

 

-         SINCE I MOVED HERE,

My dog has been having difficulty sleeping!has some difficulty to sleep.

 

-         EVER SINCE HE SAW THAT WEIRD MOVIE,

He he has been actingacts very strangely with people.

 

-         BY THE TIME THE COURSE WAS OVER,

Every student was better or: had gotten better in the pronunciation of the learned word Do you mean- ‘of the words they had learned’?.

 

                         

Dufour

 

These four sentences are very interesting. There is a lot to learn for everyone from these. Let’s do some analysis.

 

Until my crazy sister gets here, I will be able to stop listening to this song.

This sentence is a possible expression in English. The meaning is not all that strange or surprising: the speaker’s crazy sister probably plays a disgusting, weird song all of the time, and while she is out, he takes advantage of her absence to turn the music off. I suppose I would phrase it a bit differently, e.g.,

 

‘At least I won’t have to listen to that stupid song until she gets back!’

 

Since I moved here, I had worked a lot to improve my new house.

This sentence must be about the current period, because of the meaning of ‘since’. Therefore, the verb must be present, i.e.,

‘…I have worked a lot…’

 

Ever since he saw that weird movie, he has been thinking non-stop about scary things.

This is fine.

 

By the time the course was over, students will be able to do(complete) all of the SPexercices in the book.

Here you have a blatant incompatibility in the time value of the time phrase, ‘By the time the course was over’, and the verb, ‘will be able’! IS the sentence about the pst, or the future? In other words, do you mean

 

‘By the time the course was over, (the) students were able…’

or

‘By the time the course is over, (the) students will be able…’

 

 

Dupont

 

Until my crazy sister gets here my day will stay funny. I’m not sure what you mean, but the sentence seems to mean that your day will remain comical (=funny) as long as your sister is absent, and right up to the moment she returns.

 

Since I moved here, I have met many peoplepersons.

 

Ever since he saw that weird movie, he has been looking under his bed every night. Fine.

 

By the time the course was over, the students had finished their exercise.

 

 

Forest

 

Until my crazy sister gets here, I'm Spelling!gonna make food for her. This means that you will be cooking constantly, right up to the time of her arrival.

 

Since I moved here, my neighbour have been constantly spying on meare always spying me.

 

Ever since I saw that weird movie, I have been checking under my bed every time I go to sleepI have checked under my bed each  time I went to sleep.

 

By the time the course was over, I hadhave been learning a lot of things.Implies some rather strange things. Better: ‘…I had learned a lot of things.

 

 

Fournier

 

Until my crazy sister gets here, I will eat that funny pizza. Possible, but implies strongly that your constant activity will be eating pizza, right up to the moment of her arrival!

Since I moved here, I have taken the tramway four times. Really! Which city are you talking about?

Ever since he saw that weird movie, he has had a lot of nightmares. Well, he was the silly fool who went and watched it.

By the time the course was over, she had been sleeping during the

class. Possible, but odd meaning. Consider the closest French translation I can come up with: «Lorsque enfin le cours fut terminé, il lui fut arrivé de temps à autre de s’assoupir.»

 

 

Gagnon

 

1)Until my crazy sister gets here, we’ll do party ‘Party’ has become a verb in familiar English. You don’t ‘do party’, you just ‘party’.

 

2)Since I moved here, I have bought You mean, ‘too’to many things. This is a sentence that would sound a little better with the time phrase at the end of the sentence.

 

3)Ever since he saw that weird movie, he has been thinking that movies This would make sense with ‘are’were generally good.

 

4)By the time the course was over I had already learned three different lessons Fine, but what do you mean by ‘course’ and ‘lessons’?

 

Gagné

UNTIL MY CRAZY SISTER GETS HERE I will finish drying my hair. Possible, but there is the odd implication that upon her arrival there will be an abrupt change in situations –suddenly, when she comes in your hair will be dry (‘finishing’ and ‘getting here’ somehow coincide). Of course, this is exactly what people will say in conversation, although I suppose I would find it more logical to say

I will keep drying my hair until my crazy sister gets back.’

SINCE I MOVED IN I have worked in the house 15 hours a day.

EVER SINCE HE SAW THAT WEIRD MOVIE, he has been having bad dreams

BY THE TIME THE COURSE WAS OVER, I had learned that an adverb can be used in different places in a sentence.

 

Guy

 

These four sentences all make perfect sense. There are spelling problems, indicated ‘SP’ to the left of the misspelled word.

1)      Until my crazy sister gets here I will not stop reading her personal diary.

2)      Since I moved here I have been meeting great SP poeple.

3)      Ever since he saw that SP wierd movie he has been no such verb!paranoing about ducks.

4)      By the time the course was over I had taken 5 pages of  this should be pluralnote.

 

Nadeau

 

Until my crazy sister gets here, I will watch TV. Sounds prudent!

 

Since I moved here, I haven’t had any problems / haven’t been having any problems with my neighbours don't have any problem with my neighbourhood.

 

Ever since he saw that weird movie, he has been having Problems sleeping! problem to sleep.

 

By the time the course was over, I understood the meaning of the expression "by the time". Good news!

 

Paquet

 

Until my crazy sister gets here I will make a cake. (I don’t understand « Until »)

This means that you will be occupied with the making of the cake right up to the moment of (=’until’) your sister’s arrival.

 

Since I moved here, I have been receiving flowers constantly. Good for you!

 

Ever since I saw that weird movie I have been having nightmaresI’m having nighmares.

 

By the time the course was over I had asked four questions. Fine. Of course, this suggests something a little different from a more neutral formulation, e.g.,

‘During this course, I asked four questions.’

 

 

Robichaud

 

Until my crazy sister gets here, I won’t cease watching TV ininto her room.

 

Since I moved here, my cat hashave gonebecome crazy; he is constantly meowing and running aroundacross the apartment.

 

Ever since he saw that weird movie, he hasn’thaven’t been sleeping without a side light.

 

By the time the course was over, he had fallen asleep three times. Sounds like a normal growing boy!

 

 

 

Rochette

 

#1 Until my crazy sister gets here, i will take it off.

Sorry, I don’t understand. What are you going to ‘take off’? Also, ‘Until your sister comes’ is a period. Do you intend to repeatedly ‘take it off’ throughout that period? I think you mean that you will ‘take it off and keep it off until she comes’. Unless, of course, you mean that you will ‘take off’ (=get the heck out) until she gets back. I’ll bet there’s an interesting context that goes along with this…

 

#2 Since i moved here, i have been receiving flowers constantly.

Fine.

 

#3 Ever since he saw that weird movie, I have been having headaches. i am having  A bit odd to say ‘some’ here. some headaches.

 

#4 By the time the course was over, SPi had worked four times in my books.

A possible English sentence, but the meaning is a bit odd. Do you mean, ‘By the time the course was over, I had used the book (to do homework assignments?) a total of four times’? I would expect he retrospective expression ‘By the time’ to refer back to some special accomplishment or accumulation. For example, this sentence would be normal if the book was supposed to be used ten or twenty times, i.e.,

 

‘By the time the course was over, we had (still) only managed to use the book four times!’

 

Or, if the book was never supposed to be used in this way (perhaps because the teacher was expected to custom-design all of the homework exercises), but that rule was broken, we might well say:

‘By the time the course was over, we had used the book not once, not twice, but four times!’