Replace the French/Latin based and other expressions (in capital letters) with typical Anglo-Saxon phrasal verbs. Conversely, give equivalents for the phrasal verbs. Double-check in your dictionary.

Suggested corrections

People often (ARE QUITE ASTONISHED BY) can't get over my disorderly life-style. To hear some of my so-called "friends", you would think that I mess things up (sabotage things) on purpose. The truth is that I would like nothing better than (TO BECOME PEACEFULLY ESTABLISHED IN A GOOD MARRIAGE) settle down, but I just never seem to be able to get it together (slang) (manage it). After each failure, I know that I can always count on (depend upon, rely on) my buddies and fairweather friends to say, "We could tell that she was no good for you -we (WARNED YOU) told you so !" There are times when their moralizing makes me want to (VOMIT) throw up.

When I (TERMINATED MY RELATIONSHIP WITH) broke off with my first wife, I (WASNíT EXPECTING TO HAVE) wasn't counting on having so much trouble starting over. That's why I was so shaken up (shocked and confused) when things didn't (SUCCEED) work out the second time around. My third therapist (INDICATED) pointed out several problems in the way I was (EDUCATED AND RAISED) brought up which are responsible for my having trouble (LIVING ON GOOD TERMS WITH) getting along with, getting on with) other people in general, and wives in particular. One of my other therapists also suggested that I learn to (CAREFULLY DISCUSS) talk over everyday problems with my partner without getting all worked up over (upset about) little things.

I finally had to (ABANDON) give up therapy with this turkey because he was always insisting that I tell him about absolutely everything. Hell's bells, he was almost as irritating as my second and third wives, and that's really saying something. Always having to answer questions really gets under my skin (slang) (irritates me). Besides, having to take the train twice a week to see this clown was worse than being tied down (married and with obligations), and I'm not kidding! I (DECIDED) made up my mind one day that I had had enough, so I said to myself, "Alright, I'm just going to march into his office and deal with the matter (settle it) once and for all." Five minutes later, I was free, sort of. I still had a wife to get rid of (to divorce, to dispose of) -or so I thought. By the time I got back home, she had (LEFT QUICKLY AND UNCEREMONIOUSLY) taken off.

No sooner had I remarried than I was back in therapy, and I soon (DISCOVERED) found out that I was dealing with a new pair of clowns. For one thing, the counsellor had the nerve to tell me that I was in the habit of (EXPERIMENTING WITH PEOPLE) trying people out the way you do at the store with shoes or clothing, and that I was constantly (DISCARDING) throwing them out\away in the same way, too. That got me so steamed up (slang) (irritated) and pissed off (vulgar) (enraged) that I walked out of (unceremoniously left) his office. Coincidentally, it turned out that my then-wife was walking out on me (deserting me) at about the same time! I went home to find a completely bare appartment. Well, almost bare. She had tried to rip off (street slang) (steal) the fancy marble counter I had bought for the kitchen sink, but it was probably too heavy. "Oh, well, what the hell!", I thought. On the way home, I had been thinking, "Oh, goody! Now I get to try out (experiment with, have a new experience with )another therapist!" Kind of like the thrill of shopping, you know? And there I stood like an ***! idiot, trying to figure it all out . I had to think something up (imagine\conceive of some sort of plan), before it was too late for me. I was starting to wonder if I was going to wind up (ultimately become) like all the other failures on the street: run down (depleted), worn out (exhausted and extenuated), and washed up (a terminal failure) .

Then one day I (ACCIDENTALLY MET) ran into my fourth ex-wife at the billiard parlour. We started talking about the good old days, and we eventually got into the topic of all the difficulties I (HAD ENCOUNTERED) had run into trying to make up with (reconcile with) women that I had (IRRITATED) ticked off \ turned off. Finally, I (INVITED HER TO HAVE) asked her out for a nice root-beer with me, but she (REJECTED ME) turned me down. I suppose it was too difficult for her to pick up (start anew) where we had left off (discontinued). Maybe she had simply (CONSUMED HER ENTIRE SUPPLY OF) used up \ gone through all of her patience. Anyway, she agreed to (CONSIDER IT) think it over, which was very nice of her, even though she obviously didn't mean it. I was more surprised by her niceness than by her refusal. After all, those bills that I (INCURRED AND CAUSED TO ACCUMULATE DRAMATICALLY) had run up were on her credit-card. If anyone ever did something like that to me, I would get very put out (irritated and enraged), and I would probably stay that way for a long time!

My fifth wife was another story. She was very patient. What else would you expect from someone who can (TOLERATE) put up with being number five? If they ever (ERECT) put up a monument in honour of long-suffering spouses, they should take this lady as the model for the statue. It would be sort of like the opposite of the Statue of Liberty, I guess. She didn't leave me to free herself, she left to free up my time! Wasn't that considerate? I think she also left me because I used to (DISPLAY HER FOR THE PURPOSE OF ATTRACTING ATTENTION) show her off when we went out together, and at home, I was always so tied up (involved with, engrossed by conversations) on the phone, wrapped up in (engrossed and fixedly preoccupied by) my video-games, or simply spaced out (intoxicated) from drinking root-beer and watching television that I didn't pay much attention to her. She used to (ASSUME) put on an extremely pained expression at times, and go on (talk and complain continuously) about how I never showed any interest in what she called "the real me". Poor girl, she must have had some kind of psychological problem.

Strange, in retrospect, how I can dredge up (minutely recall) all these details, yet I can't quite remember her name. It started with "N", though, I'm pretty sure. I don't get married so often anymore. This is in part because I just haven't felt up to it (felt able and willing) ever since I was laid off (dismissed) from my last job at the head-shrinking shop, but mainly because I am so (EXASPERATED) fed up with people in general, friends in particular, and women most of all. As for therapists and marriage counsellors, they (DISGUST/LOSE MY INTEREST) turn me off completely.

 

"The Man on the Beach," suggested corrections

 

  1. like a (noun)
  2. as though he were a (noun) / as though he were (adjective) / as though he were (continuous verb) / as though he had a (noun) / as though he had (done something)
  3. as if he had been (past participle) / had (past participle)
  4. as though he were (present / past participle) / had (past participle)
  5. difficulty (gerund)
  6. he must have lost his watch on the beach
  7. maybe he should wait for help
  8. he may be feeling cold and lonely
  9. he must not be able to breathe
  10. he may / must have gotten lost
  11. he must have gotten lost, and got tired of walking
  12. he may / might / must not have been watching where he was going
  13. she will have to use a shovel to get him out
  14. she should have paid / been paying more attention last night
  15. she must have been playing with her shrunken head collection
  16. she must be worried / worrying about him
  17. she must be thinking that she should have called the police last night

 

A. SUPPLY THE SIMPLE PAST AND PAST PARTICIPIAL FORMS:

become swear fly stink

blow wear steal wear

dig write quit swim

drive forgive rise teach

fall lend slide sneak

feel fight draw grasp

mean stick beseech seek

B. FILL IN THE CHART.

 

CONCRETE

ABSTRACT NOUN

VERB

ADJECTIVE

ADVERB

effect

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

gratefully

 

 

 

 

produce

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

employ

 

 

 

 

skill

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

benefit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

excellent

 

 

 

 

 

 

value

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

make up

 

 

 

 

diagnosis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sick

 

 

supposition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

nausea

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

entertain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

public

 

 

 

 

 

 

specify

 

 

 

 

cynic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

type

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

similar

 

 

 

 

 

 

conclude

 

 

 

 

thought

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C. GIVE EXAMPLES i) FROM THE FOLLOWING ROOTS:

[-able-] (give an adverb)

[-mit-] (give an abstract noun)

[-rupt-] (give a negative adjective)

[audi-] (give a collective noun)

ii) FROM THE FOLLOWING ENDINGS:

[-ant]

[-hood]

[-ious]

[-ively]

D. COMPLETE THE FOLLOWING ANALOGIES:

ped- : pod- :: hemi- :________

quadriped : biped :: quadriplegic : ________

soft : soften :: liquid : ________

solid: solidify :: hard : ________

E. IDENTIFY THE PART OF SPEECH FOR THE UNDERLINED WORDS:

"If you want to be an artist or a musician, but you have some misgivings about selling your soul to the public or doing something that you find crass in order to survive, you should consider a different career. Singing, for example, is definitely a field for people who want to make commercial, rather than artistic history. Many talented singers succeed only thanks to the kindly intervention of wealthy and powerful friends. In my case, I became a singer thanks to an elderly voice teacher who kindly offered me the use of his studio."

F. MAKE UP A LITTLE SENTENCE FOR EACH: enlighten; kindly; womanly; obnoxious; similarity

G. DERIVE THE CAPITALIZED WORDS APPROPRIATELY USING [-ed], [-edly], [-ing], [-ingly]:

Mont St-Casse-Tête is SUPPOSE the most EXCITE skiing centre in the area. Perhaps we should check and see. It is said to have more THRILL rides and hills than anywhere else. According to my friends who went there last week, the tickets to ski for a whole day are SURPRISE cheap. For the tourist who is fed up with all the extra hidden costs that appear EXPECT when he, she, or it takes the family to other recreational centres, Mont St-Casse-Tête might turn out to be a fair deal.

H. UNDERLINE THE WORDS a) THAT ARE NEGATIVE DERIVATIONS, AND

b) THAT HAVE A CORRESPONDING POSITIVE FORM:

amoral; decertify; demented; demoralise; deregulate; disappointing; disarmingly; disentangle; ill-bred; indignant; innocent; irate; misdirect; mismanagement; unexpectedly

 

I. DERIVE THE NEGATIVE COUNTERPART(S) FOR THE FOLLOWING: American, informed, inhibiting, literate

J. CIRCLE A VERB FROM THE FIRST LIST, THEN CIRCLE THE APPROPRIATE ADVERB FROM THE SECOND:

i) The teacher GAZED, GLARED, GLOATED // FEEBLY, FIERCELY, FONDLY, FRANTICALLY, FURIOUSLY at the students who were playing poker in class.

ii) The nervous secretary knew that he really shouldn't touch anything on his supervisor's desk, but an important client had shown up at the office unexpectedly, and he insisted on being given a copy of his file. The secretary had no idea where it was. He GLANCED AT, GLIMPSED, GROPED THROUGH the papers AWKWARDLY, HASTILY, DEXTERIOUSLY.

iii) The street vagabond GLOWERED AT, GREETED, GRINNED AT, the obese tourist GRAVELY, GRIMLY, GRISLY, SNIDELY. The tourist was momentarily confused. Then the vagabond approached the tourist, and GLUMLY, SNEAKILY, SUDDENLY he ENSNARED, GRABBED, SNATCHED, SNOOPED the tourist's camcorder and ran like greased lightning!

DERIVE THE CAPITALIZED WORDS APPROPRIATELY:

"My great-uncle Leopold works for various obscure charities, quietly participating in and contributing to IMPROVE conditions all over the world. He is known for his completely INTEREST involvement in agrarian reform projects in South America and South-East Asia, to which he is constantly sending money. He is currently in East Zemestan, where he has helped found a school for children with specific ABLE .

Leopold never mentions his illustrious family tree, nor his education, both of which are quite IMPRESS . He is anything but a brilliant conversationalist, and his manners are remarkably PRETEND , in spite of his great wealth and sophisticated background. In fact, people who do not know about his true life's work find him rather INTEREST . Little do they realize that he has a SAINT love for his fellow-creatures, and that he labors DEVOTE day and night, sending food to the poor, comfort to the sick, and gifts to the DEPRIVE . When donations to one of his charitable organizations are DISAPPOINT low, he never moralizes at anyone, but simply makes up for the short-fall with his own money, or quietly arranges to obtain it from others like himself. When he approaches a person to solicit a donation, he is never aggressive. He simply waits for a "yes" or a "no", without applying any pressure, and if it is "no", he makes sure the person does not feel bad. Likewise, when people answer his requests COMMIT because they feel too guilty to say "no" outright, he is very gentle.

MORE ANALOGIES OF MEANING AND FORM:

attention : attentive :: caution : ______

guilt : guilty :: panic : ______

sad : sadness :: civil : ______

humid : humidity :: damp : damp______

safe : safety :: kind : ______

scary : afraid :: distress___ : distress___

frightened : scary :: upset : ______

try : trial :: withdraw : ______

certain : uncertainty :: adequate : ______

sensitive : insensitivity :: hope : ______

to listen placidly : to respond indignantly :: to err innocently : to commit a crime ______

to set up : to upset :: ______ : to lower

to make sthg. : to make sthg. oneís own :: to carry sthg.: to carry sthg.______

sweep the floor : sweeping reform :: start the car : ______

stop to smoke : stop smoking :: ______ : to quit

workforce : workload : final outcome : emotional ______

well-being : prosperity :: undertaking : ______

approximate : accurate :: estimate : ______

delay : procrastinate :: provoke : ______

feminine : femininity :: _______ : manhood

lungs : breathe :: ________ : ________

breath : lungs :: ________ : ________

 

DERIVE THE WORDS APPROPRIATELY:

The first burglar motioned to his partner, who stopped and held perfectly still. They then had a brief exchange in sign language to determine which window they would use; the first proposed the left one, with which the second silently ____CUR____. After ____ABL____ the alarm system, they quietly slipped inside. As their eyes adjusted to the dark, they both held perfectly still. Theirs was the sort of performance that is best put on with no ____AUD____. Then they began to look at the various museum displays. They examined the Picassos and several other canvasses ____APPRECIAT____ . These, however, were not the treasures the intruders coveted.

While many a criminal owed his ____LIV____ to his prowess at stealing and selling such secondary works of art as Renoirís "Bloating Party" or Van Goghís "Shelf-Portrait", our burglars were less interested in money than in the bizarre challenge of theft for its own sake. They derived pleasure and ____FIL____ from taking things no one else would dare take, and then returning them, just to humiliate the security guards. They loved to imagine how the guardsí eyes would widen with incredulity and their mouths drop open in ____BELIEF____ when they saw what had happened. Their illegal activities were not entirely without a sense of honour and ____MIT____ to the art world. Once, for example, a priceless celluloid bust of A.G. Bell disappeared without a trace from the Boston Gallery of Phone Arts. The insurance agents had already made their reports and a new exhibit was being prepared to replace the stolen sculpture, when it ____EXPECT____ reappeared one day on the curatorís desk, with a lovely greeting card inscribed, "Have a nice day"! That was the work of our mysterious pair.

Now our mischief-loving art-thieves were cautiously approaching the special exhibit in the world-famous, impregnable Pink Panther Pavilion. The first thief stopped in his tracks, and gestured ____APPOINT____ at the sign on the door: "EXHIBIT CANCELLED FOR RENOVATIONS".

SUGGESTED CORRECTIONS

CONCRETE NOUN ABSTRACT NOUN VERB ADJECTIVE ADVERB

gratuity (< gratification>) gratitude, gratefulness gratify, ingratiate grateful gratefully

effect efffectiveness effect effective effectively

PROduce production proDUCE productive productively

employer employment employ employed, employable

public, publicity public, publicity publicize public publicly

skill skill, skillfulness (to train) skillful skillfully

benefit (s), beneficiary benefit benefit beneficial beneficially

cynic cynicism (to sneer at) cynical cynically

(Your)Excellence excellence excel excellent excellently

type type, typology typify typical, typological typically, typologically similarity, simulation (<<<) resemble, simulate similar similarly

conclusion conclusion conclude (in)conclusive, concluding (in)conclusively

"specs" specificity specify specific specifically

evaluator, value value, evaluation value valuable, invaluable valuably, invaluably

thought thought, thoughtfulness think, think out thoughtful thoughtfully

the sick sickness sicken sick, sickly (pathologically)

diagnosis diagnostic(s) diagnose (un)diagnosable, (un)diagnosed

MAKE-up (maquillage) makeUP made-up (cosmetically)

supposition(s) supposition suppose supposed supposedly

nausea nausea nauseate nauseous, nauseating nauseatingly, ad nauseum

entertainer (<entertainment) entertain entertaining entertainingly

GIVE EXAMPLES a) FROM THE FOLLOWING ROOTS:

[-able-] (give an adverb) laughably

[-mit-] (give an abstract noun) commitment

[-rupt-] (give a negative adjective) uncorruptible

[audi-] (give a collective noun) audience

b) FROM THE FOLLOWING ENDINGS:

[-ant] deviant

[-hood] maidenhood

[-ious] impervious

[-ively] disruptively

COMPLETE THE FOLLOWING ANALOGIES:

ped- : pod- :: hemi- :________hemisphere

quadriped : biped :: quadriplegic : ________paraplegic

soft : soften :: liquid : ________liquefy

solid: solidify :: hard : ________harden

IDENTIFY THE PART OF SPEECH FOR THE UNDERLINED WORDS:

"If you want to be an artist or a musician, but you have some misgivings NOUN about selling DEVERBAL NOUN (GERUND) your soul to the public or doing something that you find crass ADJECTIVE in order to survive, you should consider a different career. Singing, for example, is definitely a field for people who want to make commercial, ADJECTIVE rather than artistic history. Many talented singers succeed only thanks to the kindly ADJECTIVE intervention of wealthy and powerful friends. In my case, I became a singer thanks to an elderly voice teacher who kindly ADVERB offered me the use of his studio."

NAME THE PART OF SPEECH FOR THE FOLLOWING WORDS: enlighten VERB; kindly ADJECTIVE, ADVERB; womanly ADJECTIVE; obnoxiousADJECTIVE; similarity NOUN

 

DERIVE THE CAPITALIZED WORDS APPROPRIATELY USING [-ed], [-edly], [-ing], [-ingly]:

Mont St-Casse-Tête is SUPPOSEdly the most EXCITing skiing center in the area. Perhaps we should check and see. It is said to have more THRILLing rides and hills than anywhere else. According to my friends who went there last week, the tickets to ski for a whole day are SURPRISingly cheap. For the tourist who is fed up with all the extra hidden costs that appear unEXPECTedly when he or she takes the family to other recreational centers, Mont St-Casse-Tête might turn out to be a fair deal.

UNDERLINE THE WORDS IN THE FOLLOWING a) THAT ARE NEGATIVE DERIVATIONS, AND

b) THAT HAVE A CORRESPONDING POSITIVE FORM:

amoral; decertify; demented; demoralize; deregulate; disappointing; disarmingly; disentangle; ill-bred; indignant; innocent; irate; misdirect; mismanagement; unexpectedly

DERIVE THE CAPITALIZED WORDS APPROPRIATELY:

"My great-uncle Leopold works for various obscure charities, quietly participating in and contributing to IMPROVing conditions all over the world. He is known for his completely disINTERESTed involvement in agrarian reform projects in South America and South-East Asia, to which he is constantly sending money. He is currently in East Zemestan, where he has helped found a school for children with specific disABiLities .

Leopold never mentions his illustrious family tree, nor his education, both of which are quite IMPRESSive . He is anything but a brilliant conversationalist, and his manners are remarkably un PRETENtious , in spite of his great wealth and sophisticated background. In fact, people who do not know about his true life's work find him rather unINTERESTing . Little do they realize that he has a SAINTly love for his fellow-creatures, and that he labors DEVOTEdly day and night, sending food to the poor, comfort to the sick, and gifts to the DEPRIVEd . When donations to one of his charitable organizations are DISAPPOINTingly low, he never moralizes at anyone, but simply makes up for the short-fall with his own money, or quietly arranges to obtain it from others like himself. When he approaches a person to solicit a donation, he is never aggressive. He simply waits for a "yes" or a "no", without applying any pressure, and if it is "no", he makes sure the person does not feel bad. Likewise, when people answer his requests non-COMMITally because they feel too guilty to say "no" outright, he is very gentle.

DERIVE THE NEGATIVE COUNTERPART(S) FOR THE FOLLOWING: un-/anti/non-American, un-/misinformed, uninhibiting, illiterate

CIRCLE A VERB FROM THE FIRST LIST, THEN CIRCLE THE APPROPRIATE ADVERB FROM THE SECOND ONE:

a) The teacher GAZED, GLARED, GLOATED // FEEBLY, FIERCELY, FONDLY, FRANTICALLY, FURIOUSLY at the students who were playing poker in class.

b) The nervous secretary knew that he really shouldn't touch anything on his supervisor's desk, but an important client had shown up at the office unexpectedly, and he insisted on being given a copy of his file. The secretary had no idea where it was. He GLANCED AT, GLIMPSED, GROPED THROUGH the papers AWKWARDLY, HASTILY, DEXTERIOUSLY.

c) The street vagabond GLOWERED AT, GREETED, GRINNED AT, the obese tourist GRAVELY, GRIMLY, GRISLY, SNIDELY. The tourist was momentarily confused. Then the vagabond approached the tourist, and GLUMLY, SNEAKILY, SUDDENLY he ENSNARED, GRABBED, SNATCHED, SNOOPED the tourist's camcorder and ran like greased lightning!

MORE ANALOGIES OF MEANING AND FORM:

attention : attentive :: caution : ______cautious

guilt : guilty :: panic : ______panicky

sad : sadness :: civil : ______civility

humid : humidity :: damp : ______damp, dampness

safe : safety :: kind : ______kindness, kindliness

scary : afraid :: distress___ : distress___distressed

frightened : scary :: upset : ______upsetting

try : trial :: withdraw : ______withdrawal

certain : uncertainty :: adequate : ______inadequacy

sensitive : insensitivity :: hope : ______hopelessness

to listen placidly : to respond indignantly :: to err innocently : to commit a crime ______willfully

to set up : to upset :: ______to raise : to lower

to make sthg. : to make sthg. oneís own :: to carry sthg.: to carry sthg.______through

sweep the floor : sweeping reform :: start the car : ______starting wages

stop to smoke : stop smoking :: ______to go do : to quit doing

workforce : workload : final outcome : emotional ______outburst

well-being : prosperity :: undertaking : ______enterprise

approximate : accurate :: estimate : ______precise/precision

delay : procrastinate :: provoke : _______goad

feminine : femininity :: _______manly : manhood

lungs : breathe :: ________ pores: ________ secrete

breath : lungs :: ________ secretion : ________ pores

DERIVE THE WORDS APPROPRIATELY:

The first burglar motioned to his partner, who stopped and held perfectly still. They then had a brief exchange in sign language to determine which window they would use; the first proposed the left one, with which the second silently CONCURRED. After DISABLING the alarm system, they quietly slipped inside. As their eyes adjusted to the dark, they both held perfectly still. Theirs was the sort of performance that is best put on with no AUDIENCE. Then they began to look at the various museum displays. They examined the Picassos and several other canvasses APPRECIATIVELY . These, however, were not the treasures the intruders coveted.

While many a criminal owed his LIVLIHOOD to his prowess at stealing and selling such secondary works of art as Renoirís "Bloating Party" or Van Goghís "Shelf-Portrait", our burglars were less interested in money than in the bizarre challenge of theft for its own sake. They derived pleasure and FULFILMENT from taking things no one else would dare take, and then returning them, just to humiliate the security guards. They loved to imagine how the guardsí eyes would widen with incredulity and their mouths drop open in DISBELIEF when they saw what had happened. Their illegal activities were not entirely without a sense of honour and COMMITMENT to the art world. Once, for example, a priceless celluloid bust of A.G. Bell disappeared without a trace from the Boston Gallery of Phone Arts. The insurance agents had already made their reports and a new exhibit was being prepared to replace the stolen sculpture, when it UNEXPECTEDLY reappeared one day on the curatorís desk, with a lovely greeting card inscribed, "Have a nice day"! That was the work of our mysterious pair.

Now our mischief-loving art-thieves were cautiously approaching the special exhibit in the world-famous, impregnable Pink Panther Pavilion. The first thief stopped in his tracks, and gestured DISAPPOINTEDLY at the sign on the door: "EXHIBIT CANCELLED FOR RENOVATIONS".

Convert the descriptions of the underlined noun phrases into attributive adjectives.

1. Her daughter is a ping-pong player who slams hard. She has a ...

2. It looked like a trophy that had been hard to win. It looked like a ...

3. Our sumo champion weighs 200 kilograms. We have a ...

4. After that T.V. program, our babyís hair turned green. We now have a ...

5. The tail of the lizard I caught was three feet long. I caught a lizard with ...

Suggested corrections:

She has a hard-slamming, ping-pong-playing daughter.

It looked like a hard-won trophy.

We have a 200-kilogram sumo champion.

We now have a green-haired baby.

I caught a lizard with a three-foot tail.

MAKE A COMPOUND ADJECTIVE OUT OF THE UNDERLINED PHRASE, AND WRITE IT WITH THE WORD(S) IN BOLD-FACE.

e.g.: "Her daughterĎs eyes are crossed." >>> "cross-eyed daughter"

1. The farmer's pony finally died when it was ten years old.

2. His wife, like himself, had a peculiarly sinister mind.

3. She pointed out to her husband that his position did not pay

very well, and that sanitation costs were very high.

4. She suggested a clever plan to save money.

5. They dug a huge hole six feet deep in the ground.

6. This project took them six hours and twenty-five minutes.

7. Then they dropped the pony in the hole. The "thump" sound would have made your blood curdle.

8. Their horrified neighbours came running, some carrying First Aid kits, others camcorders. This is not surprising at all! These people were all educated by television, and all their lives, they had watched programs that numb the mind and erode the I.Q.

 

Suggested corrections:

1. The farmer's ten-year-old pony.

2. His peculiarly sinister-minded wife.

3. A not very well-paid position.

4. A clever money-saving plan.

5. A huge six-foot-deep hole.

6. A six-hour-(and)twenty-five-minute project.

7. A blood-curdling "thump".

8. Television-educated people, mind-numbing, I.Q.-eroding programs.

CONJUGATE THE VERBS IN THE FOLLOWING DIALOGUE.

A- Hi, how are you! ______________________(HEAR, YOU) about Julius?

B- No, what ______________________(HAPPEN)?

A- Well, yesterday, while he ______________________(WALK) home from his... well, you know, his "shop"...

B- Yes, yes? Then what?

A- ...a cyclist ______________________(HIT) him from behind. After she ______________________(KNOCK) him over, she ______________________ (FALL) off her bike and ______________________(BREAK) her leg.

B- Son of a gun!! Are you serious? How could she have been so careless? What a turkey! ______________________(DRINK, SHE)?

A- No, but it ______________________ (MODAL OF POSSIBILITY + BE) partly Julius' fault, too. He says that he can remember __________________ (WALK) out into the street, but nothing else. He might have forgotten ______________________(LOOK) both ways before crossing.

B- But what about the cyclist? Why was she in such a hurry?

A- That's another crazy story. Apparently she ______________________(FIND OUT, JUST) that her mother ______________________(COME) to visit her for the weekend, and she wanted to get back to her apartment to "clean up", if you know what I mean!

B- Ha! I can guess!

A- Anyway, both she and Julius are still in hospital.

B- Is there any chance that they will "hit it off"?

A- I think they already have!!

B- Ha-ha, very funny. You know, I ______________________(GO) into town this evening to leave some trophies at poor Julius's shop. I guess I'll go see him in the hospital instead.

A- Sure, that's a good idea. What are friends for, anyway? When you ______________________(SEE) him, will you please give him these books? He told me just the other day that he wanted to read something to take his mind off his work, and that he ______________________(READ, NEVER) anything by Sartre. I'm sure he'll enjoy La nausée and Les mouches.

B- O.K. buddy, no problem. Julius is lucky to have friends like us.

Suggested corrections:

A- Hi, how are you! Have you heard (HEAR, YOU) about Julius?

B- No, what happened (HAPPEN)?

A- Well, yesterday, while he was walking (WALK) home from his... well, you know, his "shop"...

B- Yes, yes? Then what?

A- ...a cyclist hit (HIT) him from behind. After she knocked / had knocked (KNOCK) him over, she fell (FALL) off her bike and broke (BREAK) her leg.

B- Son of a gun!! Are you serious? How could she have been so careless? What a turkey! Had she been drinking / Was she drunk? (DRINK, SHE)?

A- No, but it could / may (MODAL OF POSSIBILITY + BE) partly Julius' fault, too. He says that he can remember walking (WALK) out into the street, but nothing else. He might have forgotten to look (LOOK) both ways before crossing.

B- But what about the cyclist? Why was she in such a hurry?

A- That's another crazy story. Apparently she had just found out (FIND OUT, JUST) that her mother was coming (COME) to visit her for the weekend, and she wanted to get back to her apartment to "clean up", if you know what I mean!

B- Ha! I can guess!

A- Anyway, both she and Julius are still in hospital.

B- Is there any chance that they will "hit it off"?

A- I think they already have!!

B- Ha-ha, very funny. You know, I was going / was going to go (GO) into town this evening to leave some trophies at poor Julius's shop. I guess I'll go see him in the hospital instead.

A- Sure, that's a good idea. What are friends for, anyway? When you see (SEE) him, will you please give him these books? He told me just the other day that he wanted to read something to take his mind off his work, and that he had never read (READ, NEVER) anything by Sartre. I'm sure he'll enjoy La nausée and Les mouches.

B- O.K. buddy, no problem. Julius is lucky to have friends like us.

 

CONJUGATE THE VERBS IN ANY APPROPRIATE WAY:

Yesterday, I (FINISH) ____________ on time. I was very proud, because I (NEVER, FINISH) ____________ on time before in my whole life! Today, I (WORK) ____________ more efficiently than usual. The morning is not over yet, and I (ALREADY, READ) ____________ three articles! Up until recently, I (ALWAYS, ASSUME) ____________ that when you (GET OLD) ____________, your brain stops (WORK) ____________ as well as it used to, but now, I (BELIEVE) ____________ that it is the opposite. Anyway, today, things (GO) ____________ great! I can tell that it (BE) ____________ a very productive week, too. I (FEEL) ____________ more energetic than usual (PREP.) ____________ the doctor (GIVE) ____________ me vitamin B-12 shots every week. I (HAVE) ____________ ten shots by now, and the energy (COME) ____________ out my ears!

Suggested corrections

Yesterday, I (FINISH) finished on time. I was very proud, because I (NEVER, FINISH) had never finished on time before in my whole life! Today, I (WORK) am working / have been working more efficiently than usual. The morning is not over yet, and I (ALREADY, READ) have already read three articles! Up until recently, I (ALWAYS, ASSUME) had always assumed / always assumed that when you (GET OLD) get old, your brain stops (WORK) working as well as it used to, but now, I (BELIEVE) believe that it is the opposite. Anyway, today, things (GO) are going / have been going great! I can tell that it (BE) is going to be / will be a very productive week, too. I (FEEL) (1) have been feeling / (2) feel more energetic than usual (PREP.) (1) since / (2) because the doctor (GIVE) has been giving me vitamin B-12 shots every week. I (HAVE) have had_ ten shots by now, and the energy (COME) is coming out my ears!

FILL IN THE BLANKS WITH THE APPROPRIATE COMPOUND ADJECTIVES. LEARN TO PRONOUNCE THEM.

That teacher has such a loud mouth; he must be half-deaf or something! He is such a ______________ turkey!

He always totes around (="carries")at least two briefcases wherever he goes. He wants to look very busy and serious! He must believe in that professional, ________________ look.

His students laugh at the way he rushes about looking busy and important; he doesnít realise that his legs are bow-shaped, like Lucky Lukeís, or like one of those bandits you see in comic-books! He looks like a ______________ _______________ bandit!

This pitiable fool also likes to pretend that he is still youthful and energetic. Ha! With his long greasy hair and his bent, old glasses, he looks confused and foolish. He is quite a _______________ fellow.

Maybe his Mother should tell him to cut his hair. Itís too long for a twit his age -down to his shoulders!

Itís a bit odd (or should I say "bizarre"?) to see an old goat with _______________ hair.

And his clothes, whew! They smell terrible. If he can afford two briefcases, canít he afford slightly _______________ clothes?!

And his fingernails!! What an old creep! They must be at least half an inch in length! Even my crazy sister doesnít have _______________ fingernails!

And he truly hates being criticised. He doesnít take friendly advice particularly well. I suggested that he try a perfectly good brand of mouth-wash I use myself. Shucks, that sure wasnít a _______________ piece of advice!

What I really canít stand are his tattoos -yecch! How he loves to show them off! This guy doesnít look particularly intellectual -or otherwise impressive- in those fruity shirts with short sleeves! A professional teacher should at least come to class wearing a _______________ shirt. [NOTICE THAT NOTHING IS UNDERLINED HERE. YOU MUST INFER THE SOURCE OF THE REQUIRED COMPOUND ADJECTIVE.]

Suggested corrections

He is such a loud-mouthed turkey!

He must believe in that professional, brief-case-toting look.

He looks like a bow-legged comic-book bandit!

He is quite a foolish-looking fellow.

Itís a bit odd (or should I say "bizarre"?) to see an old goat with shoulder-length hair.

If he can afford two briefcases, canít he afford slightly better-smelling clothes?!

Even my crazy sister doesnít have half-inch (long) fingernails!

Shucks, that sure wasnít a particularly well-taken piece of advice!

A professional teacher should at least come to class wearing a long-sleeved shirt.

My darling little Olga,

Just after I *(RECEIVE)_______________ your silly little letter, about two weeks ago, I (HAVE)_______________ a little "incident" with my room-mate. Since then, I (BE)_______________ a little busy and I (NOT, HAVE)_______________ the time to write back. Room-mates (BE) ____________ so much trouble, sometimes. Anyway, in the past two weeks, I (HAVE)_______________ four tests, and I *(HAVE) _______________ another one tomorrow. In addition, a "friend" of mine (STAY) _______________ with me (PREP.)_______ the past two or three months. I think that in general, you could say that she (BE) _______________ a very demanding person. She certainly (BE) _______________ a disgusting little twit (PREP.)_________ she has been here. I (GET)_______________ pretty fed up!

For example, even though I (WORK) _______________ this summer and I (SPEND) _______________ the whole day feeding and cleaning the &@*ÿ!! animals, she *(INSIST)_______________ that I take her absolutely everywhere in town. So far, we (GO)_______________ to the botanical gardens, the rodeo, the planetarium, the slaughterhouse, the Nova Scotia Tower, the Museum of Dead Cultures, and at least a dozen taverns. We (STILL, NOT, FIND)_______________ a tavern or restaurant that serves the kind of root-beer she likes. Every day, she makes me take her to some damn thing or another. Yesterday we (WATCH) _______________ a wrestling match in the park, and she (REFUSE) _______________ to leave until the winner (BE DECLARED)_____________. It was a big fat guy in red pajamas and a black mask. What a waste of time! Between (SHOW) _______________ her the city and (STUDY) _______________ for my $?&!!ÿ exams, recently I (HAVE) _______________ almost no time for anything else.

Right now, I (HEAR) _______________ her blowing her nose in the bathroom. I can tell that she *(FUTURE: BE)_______________ in there for a pretty long time, so I (FUTURE: TRY)_______________ to finish this letter tonight. It is 3:00 a.m., and I (SIT)_______________ at my desk. I usually can't sleep when someone in the bathroom (MAKE) _______________, well, you know, "certain noises". I think I (FUTURE: TIE HER UP) _______________ and put her in a taxi, and send her to St-Lambert. Or maybe I (FUTURE: TELL) _______________ the driver to take her to the bus station and leave her there!

Well, I guess that I (TALK)___________________ enough about all my problems. What about yours? (YOU, STILL, HAVE)___________________ that ugly boy-friend who (TALK)____________________ with his mouth full? (YOU, FEEL BETTER) __________________ (PREP.)_______ the doctor (GIVE) _______________ you Prozac? (YOUR DOG, DIE) __________________ yet? She was pretty sick, wasn't she? She (JUST, CELEBRATE) __________________ her twelfth birthday the last time I (SEE) __________________ her. Thank heavens that in my whole life, I (NEVER, HAVE) __________________ dogs- it would make me too sad to have a dying dog. How many dogs (YOU, HAVE) ____________________, in all? You told me once how many (YOU, HAVE) ____________________ before you (GET) __________________ this one, but I can't remember. I hope you aren't feeling too depressed about your poor old dog. Lately, I (FEEL) _______________ kind of "down" too, so I know what it's like.

I'm looking forward to (HEAR) ____________ from you soon, Love, Ludmilla

CORRECTION KEY

Just after I *(RECEIVE) HAD RECEIVED your silly little letter, about two weeks ago, I (HAVE) HAD a little "incident" with my room-mate. Since then, I (BE) HAVE BEEN a little busy and I (NOT, HAVE) HAVENíT HAD the time to write back. Room-mates (BE) ARE / CAN BE so much trouble, sometimes. Anyway, in the past two weeks, I (HAVE) HAVE HAD four tests, and I *(HAVE) HAVE / AM HAVING another one tomorrow. In addition, a "friend" of mine (STAY) HAS BEEN STAYING with me (PREP.) FOR the past two or three months. I think that in general, you could say that she (BE) IS / CAN BE a very demanding person. She certainly (BE) HAS BEEN a disgusting little twit (PREP.) SINCE she has been here. I (GET) AM GETTING pretty fed up!

For example, even though I (WORK) AM WORKING this summer and I (SPEND) SPEND the whole day feeding and cleaning the &@*ÿ!! animals, she *(INSIST) INSISTS / KEEPS INSISTING that I take her absolutely everywhere in town. So far, we (GO) HAVE GONE to the botanical gardens, the rodeo, the planetarium, the slaughterhouse, the Nova Scotia Tower, the Museum of Dead Cultures, and at least a dozen taverns. We (STILL, NOT, FIND) STILL HAVE NOT FOUND a tavern or restaurant that serves the kind of root-beer she likes. Every day, she makes me take her to some damn thing or another. Yesterday we (WATCH) WERE WATCHING a wrestling match in the park, and she (REFUSE) REFUSED / KEPT REFUSING to leave until the winner (BE DECLARED) HAD BEEN DECLARED. It was a big fat guy in red pajamas and a black mask. What a waste of time! Between (SHOW) SHOWING her the city and (STUDY) STUDYING for my $?&!!ÿ exams, recently I (HAVE) HAVE HAD almost no time for anything else.

Right now, I (HEAR) HEAR / CAN HEAR her blowing her nose in the bathroom. I can tell that she *(FUTURE: BE) IS GOING TO BE / WILL BE in there for a pretty long time, so I (FUTURE: TRY) WIL TRY to finish this letter tonight. It is 3:00 a.m., and I (SIT) AM SITTING at my desk. I usually can't sleep when someone in the bathroom (MAKE) IS MAKING, well, you know, "certain noises". I think I (FUTURE: TIE HER UP) WILL TIE HER UP and put her in a taxi, and send her to St-Lambert. Or maybe I (FUTURE: TELL) WILL TELL the driver to take her to the bus station Ö!

Well, I guess that I (TALK) HAVE TALKED enough about all my problems. What about yours? (YOU, STILL, HAVE) DO YOU STILL HAVE that ugly boy-friend who (TALK) TALKS with his mouth full? (YOU, FEEL BETTER) HAVE YOU BEEN FEELING BETTER (PREP.) SINCE the doctor (GIVE) GAVE / HAS BEEN GIVING you Prozac? (YOUR DOG, DIE) HAS YOUR DOG DIED yet? She was pretty sick, wasn't she? She (JUST, CELEBRATE) HAD JUST CELEBRATED her twelfth birthday the last time I (SEE) SAW her. Thank heavens that in my whole life, I (NEVER, HAVE) HAVE NEVER HADdogs- it would make me too sad to have a dying dog. How many dogs (YOU, HAVE) HAVE YOU HAD, in all? You told me once how many (YOU, HAVE) YOU HAD HAD before you (GET) GOT this one, but I can't remember. I hope you aren't feeling too depressed about your poor old dog. Lately, I (FEEL) HAVE BEEN FEELING kind of "down" too, so I know what it's like.

I'm looking forward to (HEAR) HEARING from you soon, Love, Ludmilla

HOMEWORK TO BE HANDED IN BY THE SIXTH WEEK

WRITE SHORT TEXTS CONTAINING CONDITIONALS:

1. It has recently been found that the massive dams in northern Quebec are generating vast pockets of methane gas and other atmospheric pollutants. Try to say what Hydro Qc could have done to foresee and prevent this problem. (Remember to use "low probability" forms of the "non-real" past condition and result, where appropriate, e.g. when referring to what the Company might have done had it had certain pieces of information, or different long-term objectives, or a different moral outlook.)

2. Geneviève is a 19-year old haemophiliac who suffers a lot every time she tries to participate in the normally vigorous activities of her peers, such as kick-boxing, "bungee" jumping, chicken-at-the-crossing, and tag-shoplifting (talk to your neighbours' kids if you have forgotten what these are). Even though she almost never gets cut, rough blows and strenuous exertion often cause her to have haemorraging (especially around the joints), and she requires special treatment and transfusions. Furthermore, frequent haemorraging of this type ultimately corrodes the bone and cartilage; such patients may suffer chronic pain and disability. Pretend that you are Geneviève's "significant other" (parent, husband, etc.), and she is about to take off for a wild week-end in the wilderness with some other wacky young women from college. (Use "real" conditionals, general and specific, to make specific warnings and predictions and to give general cautionary instructions respectively; use "non-real" conditionals to speculate about all of the possible ramifications of every problem that could arise.)

 

COMPLETE AND RECORD THE UNDERLINED PORTIONS OF THE SENTENCES, WITH APPROPRIATE TAG-QUESTIONS AND INTONATION [BOTH ARE ESSENTIAL].

Well, young fellow, you really need a mechanic, DON'T you!

Thatís what I thought. Very well then, letís go have a look, shall WE?

Gee-whiz, what a mess! Fixing this is going to be one heck of a job. You arenít in a hurry, are YOU?

O-kee-dokey... letís check our parts in stock. Well, it just so happens I have an entire Natzoreddy Ď92 over here in my lot! Iíll bet you thought we wouldnít have any parts at all, DIDn't you!

Thatís O K , young fellow; if you were one of those filthy rich city snobs, you wouldnít be driving a used Natzoreddy, would YOU?

Yes sir, thatís just what I always say- the rich donít have to worry about those things, DO they!

From the way it looks, you had no chance to put new oil, DID you!

Thatís just as well, because Iím going to have to put in a new oil pan anyway, haw-haw-haw!! I guess you must know what an oil pan is, don't YOU?

Say, young fellow, this isnít the first time your car has broken down out here, IS it!

Shucks, young fellow, why do you keep cracking your knuckles and looking at the time like that? You wouldnít be in some kind of hurry, would YOU?