A. SUPPLY THE SIMPLE PAST AND PAST PARTICIPIAL FORMS:

become swear fly stink

blow wear steal wear

dig write quit swim

drive forgive rise teach

fall lend slide sneak

feel fight draw grasp

mean stick beseech seek

B. FILL IN THE CHART.

 

CONCRETE

ABSTRACT NOUN

VERB

ADJECTIVE

ADVERB

effect

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

gratefully

 

 

 

 

produce

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

employ

 

 

 

 

skill

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

benefit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

excellent

 

 

 

 

 

 

value

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

make up

 

 

 

 

diagnosis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sick

 

 

supposition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

nausea

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

entertain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

public

 

 

 

 

 

 

specify

 

 

 

 

cynic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

type

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

similar

 

 

 

 

 

 

conclude

 

 

 

 

thought

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C. GIVE EXAMPLES i) FROM THE FOLLOWING ROOTS:

[-able-] (give an adverb)

[-mit-] (give an abstract noun)

[-rupt-] (give a negative adjective)

[audi-] (give a collective noun)

ii) FROM THE FOLLOWING ENDINGS:

[-ant]

[-hood]

[-ious]

[-ively]

D. COMPLETE THE FOLLOWING ANALOGIES:

ped- : pod- :: hemi- :________

quadriped : biped :: quadriplegic : ________

soft : soften :: liquid : ________

solid: solidify :: hard : ________

E. IDENTIFY THE PART OF SPEECH FOR THE UNDERLINED WORDS:

"If you want to be an artist or a musician, but you have some misgivings about selling your soul to the public or doing something that you find crass in order to survive, you should consider a different career. Singing, for example, is definitely a field for people who want to make commercial, rather than artistic history. Many talented singers succeed only thanks to the kindly intervention of wealthy and powerful friends. In my case, I became a singer thanks to an elderly voice teacher who kindly offered me the use of his studio."

F. MAKE UP A LITTLE SENTENCE FOR EACH: enlighten; kindly; womanly; obnoxious; similarity

G. DERIVE THE CAPITALIZED WORDS APPROPRIATELY USING [-ed], [-edly], [-ing], [-ingly]:

Mont St-Casse-Tęte is SUPPOSE the most EXCITE skiing centre in the area. Perhaps we should check and see. It is said to have more THRILL rides and hills than anywhere else. According to my friends who went there last week, the tickets to ski for a whole day are SURPRISE cheap. For the tourist who is fed up with all the extra hidden costs that appear EXPECT when he, she, or it takes the family to other recreational centres, Mont St-Casse-Tęte might turn out to be a fair deal.

H. UNDERLINE THE WORDS a) THAT ARE NEGATIVE DERIVATIONS, AND

b) THAT HAVE A CORRESPONDING POSITIVE FORM:

amoral; decertify; demented; demoralise; deregulate; disappointing; disarmingly; disentangle; ill-bred; indignant; innocent; irate; misdirect; mismanagement; unexpectedly

 

I. DERIVE THE NEGATIVE COUNTERPART(S) FOR THE FOLLOWING: American, informed, inhibiting, literate

J. CIRCLE A VERB FROM THE FIRST LIST, THEN CIRCLE THE APPROPRIATE ADVERB FROM THE SECOND:

i) The teacher GAZED, GLARED, GLOATED // FEEBLY, FIERCELY, FONDLY, FRANTICALLY, FURIOUSLY at the students who were playing poker in class.

ii) The nervous secretary knew that he really shouldn't touch anything on his supervisor's desk, but an important client had shown up at the office unexpectedly, and he insisted on being given a copy of his file. The secretary had no idea where it was. He GLANCED AT, GLIMPSED, GROPED THROUGH the papers AWKWARDLY, HASTILY, DEXTERIOUSLY.

iii) The street vagabond GLOWERED AT, GREETED, GRINNED AT, the obese tourist GRAVELY, GRIMLY, GRISLY, SNIDELY. The tourist was momentarily confused. Then the vagabond approached the tourist, and GLUMLY, SNEAKILY, SUDDENLY he ENSNARED, GRABBED, SNATCHED, SNOOPED the tourist's camcorder and ran like greased lightning!

DERIVE THE CAPITALIZED WORDS APPROPRIATELY:

"My great-uncle Leopold works for various obscure charities, quietly participating in and contributing to IMPROVE conditions all over the world. He is known for his completely INTEREST involvement in agrarian reform projects in South America and South-East Asia, to which he is constantly sending money. He is currently in East Zemestan, where he has helped found a school for children with specific ABLE .

Leopold never mentions his illustrious family tree, nor his education, both of which are quite IMPRESS . He is anything but a brilliant conversationalist, and his manners are remarkably PRETEND , in spite of his great wealth and sophisticated background. In fact, people who do not know about his true life's work find him rather INTEREST . Little do they realize that he has a SAINT love for his fellow-creatures, and that he labors DEVOTE day and night, sending food to the poor, comfort to the sick, and gifts to the DEPRIVE . When donations to one of his charitable organizations are DISAPPOINT low, he never moralizes at anyone, but simply makes up for the short-fall with his own money, or quietly arranges to obtain it from others like himself. When he approaches a person to solicit a donation, he is never aggressive. He simply waits for a "yes" or a "no", without applying any pressure, and if it is "no", he makes sure the person does not feel bad. Likewise, when people answer his requests COMMIT because they feel too guilty to say "no" outright, he is very gentle.

MORE ANALOGIES OF MEANING AND FORM:

attention : attentive :: caution : ______

guilt : guilty :: panic : ______

sad : sadness :: civil : ______

humid : humidity :: damp : damp______

safe : safety :: kind : ______

scary : afraid :: distress___ : distress___

frightened : scary :: upset : ______

try : trial :: withdraw : ______

certain : uncertainty :: adequate : ______

sensitive : insensitivity :: hope : ______

to listen placidly : to respond indignantly :: to err innocently : to commit a crime ______

to set up : to upset :: ______ : to lower

to make sthg. : to make sthg. one’s own :: to carry sthg.: to carry sthg.______

sweep the floor : sweeping reform :: start the car : ______

stop to smoke : stop smoking :: ______ : to quit

workforce : workload : final outcome : emotional ______

well-being : prosperity :: undertaking : ______

approximate : accurate :: estimate : ______

delay : procrastinate :: provoke : ______

feminine : femininity :: _______ : manhood

lungs : breathe :: ________ : ________

breath : lungs :: ________ : ________

 

DERIVE THE WORDS APPROPRIATELY:

The first burglar motioned to his partner, who stopped and held perfectly still. They then had a brief exchange in sign language to determine which window they would use; the first proposed the left one, with which the second silently ____CUR____. After ____ABL____ the alarm system, they quietly slipped inside. As their eyes adjusted to the dark, they both held perfectly still. Theirs was the sort of performance that is best put on with no ____AUD____. Then they began to look at the various museum displays. They examined the Picassos and several other canvasses ____APPRECIAT____ . These, however, were not the treasures the intruders coveted.

While many a criminal owed his ____LIV____ to his prowess at stealing and selling such secondary works of art as Renoir’s "Bloating Party" or Van Gogh’s "Shelf-Portrait", our burglars were less interested in money than in the bizarre challenge of theft for its own sake. They derived pleasure and ____FIL____ from taking things no one else would dare take, and then returning them, just to humiliate the security guards. They loved to imagine how the guards’ eyes would widen with incredulity and their mouths drop open in ____BELIEF____ when they saw what had happened. Their illegal activities were not entirely without a sense of honour and ____MIT____ to the art world. Once, for example, a priceless celluloid bust of A.G. Bell disappeared without a trace from the Boston Gallery of Phone Arts. The insurance agents had already made their reports and a new exhibit was being prepared to replace the stolen sculpture, when it ____EXPECT____ reappeared one day on the curator’s desk, with a lovely greeting card inscribed, "Have a nice day"! That was the work of our mysterious pair.

Now our mischief-loving art-thieves were cautiously approaching the special exhibit in the world-famous, impregnable Pink Panther Pavilion. The first thief stopped in his tracks, and gestured ____APPOINT____ at the sign on the door: "EXHIBIT CANCELLED FOR RENOVATIONS".

SUGGESTED CORRECTIONS

CONCRETE NOUN ABSTRACT NOUN VERB ADJECTIVE ADVERB

gratuity (< gratification>) gratitude, gratefulness gratify, ingratiate grateful gratefully

effect efffectiveness effect effective effectively

PROduce production proDUCE productive productively

employer employment employ employed, employable

public, publicity public, publicity publicize public publicly

skill skill, skillfulness (to train) skillful skillfully

benefit (s), beneficiary benefit benefit beneficial beneficially

cynic cynicism (to sneer at) cynical cynically

(Your)Excellence excellence excel excellent excellently

type type, typology typify typical, typological typically, typologically similarity, simulation (<<<) resemble, simulate similar similarly

conclusion conclusion conclude (in)conclusive, concluding (in)conclusively

"specs" specificity specify specific specifically

evaluator, value value, evaluation value valuable, invaluable valuably, invaluably

thought thought, thoughtfulness think, think out thoughtful thoughtfully

the sick sickness sicken sick, sickly (pathologically)

diagnosis diagnostic(s) diagnose (un)diagnosable, (un)diagnosed

MAKE-up (maquillage) makeUP made-up (cosmetically)

supposition(s) supposition suppose supposed supposedly

nausea nausea nauseate nauseous, nauseating nauseatingly, ad nauseum

entertainer (<entertainment) entertain entertaining entertainingly

GIVE EXAMPLES a) FROM THE FOLLOWING ROOTS:

[-able-] (give an adverb) laughably

[-mit-] (give an abstract noun) commitment

[-rupt-] (give a negative adjective) uncorruptible

[audi-] (give a collective noun) audience

b) FROM THE FOLLOWING ENDINGS:

[-ant] deviant

[-hood] maidenhood

[-ious] impervious

[-ively] disruptively

COMPLETE THE FOLLOWING ANALOGIES:

ped- : pod- :: hemi- :________hemisphere

quadriped : biped :: quadriplegic : ________paraplegic

soft : soften :: liquid : ________liquefy

solid: solidify :: hard : ________harden

IDENTIFY THE PART OF SPEECH FOR THE UNDERLINED WORDS:

"If you want to be an artist or a musician, but you have some misgivings NOUN about selling DEVERBAL NOUN (GERUND) your soul to the public or doing something that you find crass ADJECTIVE in order to survive, you should consider a different career. Singing, for example, is definitely a field for people who want to make commercial, ADJECTIVE rather than artistic history. Many talented singers succeed only thanks to the kindly ADJECTIVE intervention of wealthy and powerful friends. In my case, I became a singer thanks to an elderly voice teacher who kindly ADVERB offered me the use of his studio."

NAME THE PART OF SPEECH FOR THE FOLLOWING WORDS: enlighten VERB; kindly ADJECTIVE, ADVERB; womanly ADJECTIVE; obnoxiousADJECTIVE; similarity NOUN

 

DERIVE THE CAPITALIZED WORDS APPROPRIATELY USING [-ed], [-edly], [-ing], [-ingly]:

Mont St-Casse-Tęte is SUPPOSEdly the most EXCITing skiing center in the area. Perhaps we should check and see. It is said to have more THRILLing rides and hills than anywhere else. According to my friends who went there last week, the tickets to ski for a whole day are SURPRISingly cheap. For the tourist who is fed up with all the extra hidden costs that appear unEXPECTedly when he or she takes the family to other recreational centers, Mont St-Casse-Tęte might turn out to be a fair deal.

UNDERLINE THE WORDS IN THE FOLLOWING a) THAT ARE NEGATIVE DERIVATIONS, AND

b) THAT HAVE A CORRESPONDING POSITIVE FORM:

amoral; decertify; demented; demoralize; deregulate; disappointing; disarmingly; disentangle; ill-bred; indignant; innocent; irate; misdirect; mismanagement; unexpectedly

DERIVE THE CAPITALIZED WORDS APPROPRIATELY:

"My great-uncle Leopold works for various obscure charities, quietly participating in and contributing to IMPROVing conditions all over the world. He is known for his completely disINTERESTed involvement in agrarian reform projects in South America and South-East Asia, to which he is constantly sending money. He is currently in East Zemestan, where he has helped found a school for children with specific disABiLities .

Leopold never mentions his illustrious family tree, nor his education, both of which are quite IMPRESSive . He is anything but a brilliant conversationalist, and his manners are remarkably un PRETENtious , in spite of his great wealth and sophisticated background. In fact, people who do not know about his true life's work find him rather unINTERESTing . Little do they realize that he has a SAINTly love for his fellow-creatures, and that he labors DEVOTEdly day and night, sending food to the poor, comfort to the sick, and gifts to the DEPRIVEd . When donations to one of his charitable organizations are DISAPPOINTingly low, he never moralizes at anyone, but simply makes up for the short-fall with his own money, or quietly arranges to obtain it from others like himself. When he approaches a person to solicit a donation, he is never aggressive. He simply waits for a "yes" or a "no", without applying any pressure, and if it is "no", he makes sure the person does not feel bad. Likewise, when people answer his requests non-COMMITally because they feel too guilty to say "no" outright, he is very gentle.

DERIVE THE NEGATIVE COUNTERPART(S) FOR THE FOLLOWING: un-/anti/non-American, un-/misinformed, uninhibiting, illiterate

CIRCLE A VERB FROM THE FIRST LIST, THEN CIRCLE THE APPROPRIATE ADVERB FROM THE SECOND ONE:

a) The teacher GAZED, GLARED, GLOATED // FEEBLY, FIERCELY, FONDLY, FRANTICALLY, FURIOUSLY at the students who were playing poker in class.

b) The nervous secretary knew that he really shouldn't touch anything on his supervisor's desk, but an important client had shown up at the office unexpectedly, and he insisted on being given a copy of his file. The secretary had no idea where it was. He GLANCED AT, GLIMPSED, GROPED THROUGH the papers AWKWARDLY, HASTILY, DEXTERIOUSLY.

c) The street vagabond GLOWERED AT, GREETED, GRINNED AT, the obese tourist GRAVELY, GRIMLY, GRISLY, SNIDELY. The tourist was momentarily confused. Then the vagabond approached the tourist, and GLUMLY, SNEAKILY, SUDDENLY he ENSNARED, GRABBED, SNATCHED, SNOOPED the tourist's camcorder and ran like greased lightning!

MORE ANALOGIES OF MEANING AND FORM:

attention : attentive :: caution : ______cautious

guilt : guilty :: panic : ______panicky

sad : sadness :: civil : ______civility

humid : humidity :: damp : ______damp, dampness

safe : safety :: kind : ______kindness, kindliness

scary : afraid :: distress___ : distress___distressed

frightened : scary :: upset : ______upsetting

try : trial :: withdraw : ______withdrawal

certain : uncertainty :: adequate : ______inadequacy

sensitive : insensitivity :: hope : ______hopelessness

to listen placidly : to respond indignantly :: to err innocently : to commit a crime ______willfully

to set up : to upset :: ______to raise : to lower

to make sthg. : to make sthg. one’s own :: to carry sthg.: to carry sthg.______through

sweep the floor : sweeping reform :: start the car : ______starting wages

stop to smoke : stop smoking :: ______to go do : to quit doing

workforce : workload : final outcome : emotional ______outburst

well-being : prosperity :: undertaking : ______enterprise

approximate : accurate :: estimate : ______precise/precision

delay : procrastinate :: provoke : _______goad

feminine : femininity :: _______manly : manhood

lungs : breathe :: ________ pores: ________ secrete

breath : lungs :: ________ secretion : ________ pores

DERIVE THE WORDS APPROPRIATELY:

The first burglar motioned to his partner, who stopped and held perfectly still. They then had a brief exchange in sign language to determine which window they would use; the first proposed the left one, with which the second silently CONCURRED. After DISABLING the alarm system, they quietly slipped inside. As their eyes adjusted to the dark, they both held perfectly still. Theirs was the sort of performance that is best put on with no AUDIENCE. Then they began to look at the various museum displays. They examined the Picassos and several other canvasses APPRECIATIVELY . These, however, were not the treasures the intruders coveted.

While many a criminal owed his LIVLIHOOD to his prowess at stealing and selling such secondary works of art as Renoir’s "Bloating Party" or Van Gogh’s "Shelf-Portrait", our burglars were less interested in money than in the bizarre challenge of theft for its own sake. They derived pleasure and FULFILMENT from taking things no one else would dare take, and then returning them, just to humiliate the security guards. They loved to imagine how the guards’ eyes would widen with incredulity and their mouths drop open in DISBELIEF when they saw what had happened. Their illegal activities were not entirely without a sense of honour and COMMITMENT to the art world. Once, for example, a priceless celluloid bust of A.G. Bell disappeared without a trace from the Boston Gallery of Phone Arts. The insurance agents had already made their reports and a new exhibit was being prepared to replace the stolen sculpture, when it UNEXPECTEDLY reappeared one day on the curator’s desk, with a lovely greeting card inscribed, "Have a nice day"! That was the work of our mysterious pair.

Now our mischief-loving art-thieves were cautiously approaching the special exhibit in the world-famous, impregnable Pink Panther Pavilion. The first thief stopped in his tracks, and gestured DISAPPOINTEDLY at the sign on the door: "EXHIBIT CANCELLED FOR RENOVATIONS".